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Subelement G1
Commission's Rules
Section G1C
Transmitter power regulations; data emission standards; 60-meter operation requirements
What is the maximum transmitting power an amateur station may use on 10.140 MHz?
  • Correct Answer
    200 watts PEP output
  • 1000 watts PEP output
  • 1500 watts PEP output
  • 2000 watts PEP output

The FCC sets maximum transmitting power limits (Peak Envelope Power) for each amateur frequency band. The given frequency of 10.140 MHz (wavelength = 300/10.140 = 29.58 m) falls within the 30 meter band. The maximum transmitting power allowed on this band is 200 watts PEP output.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.313(c)(1)]

Link to ARRL color chart: US Amateur Radio Bands

Link to ARRL text based band table (more accessible): US Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations

Last edited by tax_fb. Register to edit

Tags: transmit power 30 meters arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum transmitting power an amateur station may use on the 12-meter band?
  • 50 watts PEP output
  • 200 watts PEP output
  • Correct Answer
    1500 watts PEP output
  • An effective radiated power equivalent to 100 watts from a half-wave dipole

(C). The FCC sets maximum transmitting power limits (Peak Envelope Power) for each amateur frequency band. The maximum transmitting power allowed on the 12 meter band is 1500 watts PEP output.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.313(a), (b)]

Link to ARRL color chart: US Amateur Radio Bands

Link to ARRL text based band table (more accessible): US Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations

Tip: for all commonly used bands (from 160m to 70cm, with exceptions for 60m, 30m and 1.25m), maximum transmitting power is 1500 watts PEP

Last edited by djw3lch. Register to edit

Tags: transmit power 12 meters arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum bandwidth permitted by FCC rules for Amateur Radio stations transmitting on USB frequencies in the 60-meter band?
  • Correct Answer
    2.8 kHz
  • 5.6 kHz
  • 1.8 kHz
  • 3 kHz

The 60 meter band is a special case.

Amateur allocation is secondary—the government has first dibs, and amateurs can only use 5 specific frequency channels.

To keep interference to a minimum when using voice modes, amateur radio operators may only use Upper Sideband signals with a maximum bandwidth of 2.8 kHz.

There's also a power restriction (100W PEP).

Refer to FCC Part: [97.303(s)]

Link to ARRL chart: US Amateur Radio Bands

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Tags: 60 meters bandwidth rules and regulations ssb arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

Which of the following limitations apply to transmitter power on every amateur band?
  • Correct Answer
    Only the minimum power necessary to carry out the desired communications should be used
  • Power must be limited to 200 watts when using data transmissions
  • Power should be limited as necessary to avoid interference to another radio service on the frequency
  • Effective radiated power cannot exceed 1500 watts

(A). Strictly speaking, the FCC allows us to use up to a maximum of 1500 watts PEP output on the 14 MHz (20 meter) band. However, we should ALWAYS use only the minimum power necessary to carry out the desired communications. This minimum power use statement is true for using any frequency. We run less risk of causing harmful interference running at only the lowest power necessary rather than blasting the airways with over-powered signals.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.313(a)]

Link to ARRL color chart: US Amateur Radio Bands

Link to ARRL text based band table (more accessible): US Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations

Last edited by wacktru3. Register to edit

Tags: 20 meters transmit power arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the limit for transmitter power on the 28 MHz band for a General Class control operator?
  • 100 watts PEP output
  • 1000 watts PEP output
  • Correct Answer
    1500 watts PEP output
  • 2000 watts PEP output

(C). The FCC sets maximum transmitting power limits (Peak Envelope Power) for each amateur frequency band. We are allowed to use a maximum of 1500 watts PEP output on the 28 MHz (10 meter) band.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.313(b)]

Link to ARRL color chart: US Amateur Radio Bands

Link to ARRL text based band table (more accessible): US Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations

Last edited by kd8qjz. Register to edit

Tags: transmit power 10 meter arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the limit for transmitter power on the 1.8 MHz band?
  • 200 watts PEP output
  • 1000 watts PEP output
  • 1200 watts PEP output
  • Correct Answer
    1500 watts PEP output

(D). The FCC sets maximum transmitting power limits (Peak Envelope Power) for each amateur frequency band. We are allowed to use up to a maximum of 1500 watts PEP output on the 1.8 MHz (160 meter) band.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.313(b)]

Link to ARRL color chart US Amateur Radio Bands

Link to ARRL text based band table (more accessible): US Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations

Last edited by veganbiker. Register to edit

Tags: 160 meters transmit power arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmission on the 20-meter band?
  • 56 kilobaud
  • 19.6 kilobaud
  • 1200 baud
  • Correct Answer
    300 baud

(D). Radioteletype (RTTY) or data transmissions are limited to a maximum symbol rate of 300 baud on the 20 meter band to limit the amount of bandwidth used. (See the table below).

Note: Shorter wavelengths allow higher baud rates.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.305(c), 97.307(f)(3)]

Table: Maximum RTTY/Data Symbol Rates and Bandwidth

For Use on Amateur Radio Bands

Band
(wavelength)
Symbol Rate / Bandwidth
(baud)
160m to 12m 300 baud
10 m 1200 baud
6m & 2m 19.6 kilobaud
1.25m & 70cm 56 kilobaud
33cm and above no limit

Last edited by nerdman1024. Register to edit

Tags: digital modes 20 meters arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmitted at frequencies below 28 MHz?
  • 56 kilobaud
  • 19.6 kilobaud
  • 1200 baud
  • Correct Answer
    300 baud

The maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data at frequencies below 28 MHz is 300 baud.


This is somewhat of a trick question. When you see 28MHz (10 meter band) you might be inclined to answer 1200 Baud. However, the question states "BELOW" 28 MHz (160 meters to 12 meters). so the correct answer is 300 baud.

Radioteletype (RTTY) and data transmissions are limited in their maximum permitted symbol rate to control the amount of bandwidth used. Frequencies below 28 MHz (below the 10 meter band = 12 meters to 160 meters) are restricted to using a maximum symbol rate of 300 baud. (See the table below)

Note: Shorter wavelengths are allowed greater baud rates.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.305(c) and 97.307(f)(3)]

Table: Maximum RTTY/Data Symbol Rates and Bandwidth

For Use on Amateur Radio Bands

Band
(wavelength)
Symbol Rate / Bandwidth
(baud)
160m to 12m 300 baud
10 m 1200 baud
6m & 2m 19.6 kilobaud
1.25m & 70cm 56 kilobaud
33cm and above no limit

To help recognize them: it seems four options will always be 300/1200/19.6k/56k, so we just need to correspond them to the range of wavelength in order: 15m/10m/5m/1m -- multiples of 5.

Last edited by ldwyze. Register to edit

Tags: digital modes 10 meter arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmitted on the 1.25-meter and 70-centimeter bands?
  • Correct Answer
    56 kilobaud
  • 19.6 kilobaud
  • 1200 baud
  • 300 baud

Radioteletype (RTTY) and data transmissions are limited to a maximum symbol rate (baud) so that they do not use up too much bandwidth. The lower the frequency, the lower the allowed baud rate.

The 1.25 m and 70 cm bands are limited to 56,000 baud (56 kilobaud). The frequencies above the 70 cm band have no limit at all.

To help remember this, notice that 1.25 m and 70 cm are close to 1 meter, and note that the 56 kilobaud is the highest rate limit provided in the options (one => top).

Refer to FCC Part: [97.305(c) and 97.307(f)(4)]

Table: Maximum RTTY/Data Symbol Rates and Bandwidth

For Use on Amateur Radio Bands

Band
(wavelength)
Symbol Rate / Bandwidth
(baud)
160m to 12m 300 baud
10 m 1200 baud
6m & 2m 19.6 kilobaud
1.25m & 70cm 56 kilobaud
33cm and above no limit

Last edited by nerdman1024. Register to edit

Tags: digital modes 1.25 meter arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmissions on the 10-meter band?
  • 56 kilobaud
  • 19.6 kilobaud
  • Correct Answer
    1200 baud
  • 300 baud

Radioteletype (RTTY) and data transmissions are limited to a maximum symbol rate (baud) so that they do not use up too much bandwidth. The lower the frequency, the lower the allowed baud rate.

For the exam note that the 10 meter band has an allowed maximum baud rate of 1200.

If you need a mnemonic, try 10 m => about 1000 baud.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.305(c) and 97.307(f)(4)]

Table: Maximum RTTY/Data Symbol Rates and Bandwidth

For Use on Amateur Radio Bands

Band
(wavelength)
Symbol Rate / Bandwidth
(baud)
160m to 12m 300 baud
10 m 1200 baud
6m & 2m 19.6 kilobaud
1.25m & 70cm 56 kilobaud
33cm and above no limit

Last edited by nerdman1024. Register to edit

Tags: digital modes 10 meter arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmissions on the 2-meter band?
  • 56 kilobaud
  • Correct Answer
    19.6 kilobaud
  • 1200 baud
  • 300 baud

Radioteletype (RTTY) and data transmissions are limited to a maximum symbol rate (baud) so that they do not use up too much bandwidth. The lower the frequency, the lower the allowed baud rate.

The exam always shows the same options for the maximum symbol rate questions:

  • 300 baud (below the 10 m)
  • 1200 baud (10 m)
  • 19.6 kilobaud (6 m, 2 m)
  • 56 kilobaud (1.25 m, 70 cm)

If you need a mnemonic, try 2 m => almost 20 kilobaud.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.305(c) and 97.307(f)(5)] Table: Maximum RTTY/Data Symbol Rates and Bandwidth

For Use on Amateur Radio Bands

Band
(wavelength)
Symbol Rate / Bandwidth
(baud)
160m to 12m 300 baud
10 m 1200 baud
6m & 2m 19.6 kilobaud
1.25m & 70cm 56 kilobaud
33cm and above no limit

Last edited by nerdman1024. Register to edit

Tags: digital modes 2 meter arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

Which of the following is required by the FCC rules when operating in the 60-meter band?
  • Correct Answer
    If you are using an antenna other than a dipole, you must keep a record of the gain of your antenna
  • You must keep a record of the date, time, frequency, power level, and stations worked
  • You must keep a record of all third-party traffic
  • You must keep a record of the manufacturer of your equipment and the antenna used

The 60 meter band is a unique band that amateur stations may use. The amateur radio service is secondary to the government when using this band and we are restricted to using 5 specific channels for only upper sideband voice communications. The power and bandwidth on this frequency range is also tightly specified. Because of the exact nature of operations on this band and to avoid interference with government communications, the FCC requires that if you are using other than a dipole antenna, you must keep a record of the gain of your antenna. This is to demonstrate that you are not using too much output power while operating on this frequency.

Refer to FCC Part: [97.303(s)]

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Tags: 60 meters rules and regulations operating rules arrl module 4 arrl chapter 2

What must be done before using a new digital protocol on the air?
  • Type-certify equipment to FCC standards
  • Obtain an experimental license from the FCC
  • Correct Answer
    Publicly document the technical characteristics of the protocol
  • Submit a rule-making proposal to the FCC describing the codes and methods of the technique

Rules about digital modes are found in 47 C.F.R 97.309, subpart (a)(4) allows any mode that is publicly documented, so an experimental or rule-making petition would not be required.

FCC Type Certification does not cover digital modes on Amateur Radio.

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Tags: arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What is the maximum power limit on the 60-meter band?
  • 1500 watts PEP
  • 10 watts RMS
  • Correct Answer
    ERP of 100 watts PEP with respect to a dipole
  • ERP of 100 watts PEP with respect to an isotropic antenna

47 CFR 97.313 covers power limits across bands, part i regulates the power on the 60-meter band.

Important to note on 60-meter band: if you are operating with an antenna with gain above a half-wave dipole, you must retain documentation showing the gain and/or calculations to ensure you do not exceed the 100 watt PEP ERP limit.

Last edited by abartlett. Register to edit

Tags: arrl chapter 3 arrl module 9

What measurement is specified by FCC rules that regulate maximum power output?
  • RMS
  • Average
  • Forward
  • Correct Answer
    PEP

Peak Envelope Power. This is the highest power level emitted at the output of a transmitter regardless of modulation and other variables.

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