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Subelement G2
Operating Procedures
Section G2A
Phone operating procedures; USB/LSB conventions; breaking into a contact; VOX operation
Which sideband is most commonly used for voice communications on frequencies of 14 MHz or higher?
  • Correct Answer
    Upper sideband
  • Lower sideband
  • Vestigial sideband
  • Double sideband

(A). To keep bandwidth to a minimum and to make transmissions consistent the upper sideband is used by convention for voice communications on frequencies 14 MHz or higher.

Note: Remember that the HIGHER frequencies (smaller wavelengths) generally use the UPPER sideband. LOWER frequencies (larger wavelengths) generally use the LOWER sideband.

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Tags: ssb hf operating procedures 20 meters 15 meters 10 meter arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Which of the following modes is most commonly used for voice communications on the 160-meter, 75-meter, and 40-meter bands?
  • Upper sideband
  • Correct Answer
    Lower sideband
  • Vestigial sideband
  • Double sideband

(B). To make communications consistent and to keep bandwidths to a minimum, the convention is to use lower sideband (LSB) communications for the longer wavelength (lower frequency) bands at 160, 75, and 40 meters.

Note: Just remember that LOWER frequencies (longer wavelengths) generally use the LOWER sideband, and the HIGHER frequencies (shorter wavelengths) generally use the UPPER sideband.

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Tags: ssb hf 160 meters 75/80 meters 40 meters arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Which of the following is most commonly used for SSB voice communications in the VHF and UHF bands?
  • Correct Answer
    Upper sideband
  • Lower sideband
  • Vestigial sideband
  • Double sideband

(A). Amateur radio operators normally designate either upper or lower sideband for phone communications on a specific band to keep things consistent and to keep bandwidths reasonable. The Upper Sideband (USB) is most commonly used for SSB voice communications in the VHF (very high frequency) and UHF (ultra high frequency) bands.

Note: Just remember that HIGHER frequencies generally use the UPPER sideband, and LOWER frequencies generally use the LOWER sideband.

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Tags: ssb vhf uhf voice arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Which mode is most commonly used for voice communications on the 17-meter and 12-meter bands?
  • Correct Answer
    Upper sideband
  • Lower sideband
  • Vestigial sideband
  • Double sideband

The 17 and 12 meter bands are some of the higher frequency bands (shorter wavelength) to which general class operators are granted privileges. The convention is to use the Upper Sideband on these frequencies for voice communications.

Note: Just remember that HIGHER frequencies above 10 MHz (shorter wavelengths) generally use the UPPER sideband, and LOWER frequencies below 10 MHz (longer wavelengths) generally use the LOWER sideband.

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Tags: 12 meters 17 meters ssb operating procedures arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Which mode of voice communication is most commonly used on the HF amateur bands?
  • Frequency modulation
  • Double sideband
  • Correct Answer
    Single sideband
  • Phase modulation

(C). One of the signal properties that we have to be aware of is signal bandwidth. Single sideband communications are most commonly used on the high frequency amateur bands because they should take up less than 3 kHz of bandwidth.

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Tags: voice hf ssb arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Which of the following is an advantage when using single sideband, as compared to other analog voice modes on the HF amateur bands?
  • Very high fidelity voice modulation
  • Less subject to interference from atmospheric static crashes
  • Ease of tuning on receive and immunity to impulse noise
  • Correct Answer
    Less bandwidth used and greater power efficiency

(B). Single sideband operations have a number of advantages over other voice communication methods, especially when used for the HF amateur bands. They use much less bandwidth (less than 3 kHz) and they also have a higher power efficiency as the power is directed over a smaller segment of the band.

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Tags: ssb bandwidth transmit power voice phone arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Which of the following statements is true of the single sideband voice mode?
  • Only one sideband and the carrier are transmitted; the other sideband is suppressed
  • Correct Answer
    Only one sideband is transmitted; the other sideband and carrier are suppressed
  • SSB is the only voice mode that is authorized on the 20-meter, 15-meter, and 10-meter amateur bands
  • SSB is the only voice mode that is authorized on the 160-meter, 75-meter, and 40-meter amateur bands

(B). Single sideband (SSB) voice mode is often used in voice communications because of its smaller bandwidth and higher power efficiency. The smaller bandwidth is accomplished by only transmitting one sideband of the signal; while the other sideband and carrier wave are suppressed.

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Tags: ssb voice phone arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

What is the recommended way to break in to a phone contact?
  • Say "QRZ" several times, followed by your call sign
  • Correct Answer
    Say your call sign once
  • Say "Breaker Breaker"
  • Say "CQ" followed by the call sign of either station

(B). You don't need to say "Break", "QRZ" or "CQ" or any other jargon when trying to enter a conversation using voice operations. All you need to do is to listen for a gap in the conversation and then say your call sign during a break between the transmissions from the other stations, so that you can be heard, identified, and invited to join in!

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Tags: operating procedures phone arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Why do most amateur stations use lower sideband on the 160-meter, 75-meter, and 40-meter bands?
  • Lower sideband is more efficient than upper sideband at these frequencies
  • Lower sideband is the only sideband legal on these frequency bands
  • Because it is fully compatible with an AM detector
  • Correct Answer
    It is good amateur practice

(D). There are no hard and fast rules from the FCC, however it is current amateur practice to use the lower sideband (LSB) on the 160, 75 and 40 meter bands.

Note: Just remember that LOWER frequencies (longer wavelengths) generally use the LOWER sideband, while HIGHER frequencies (shorter wavelengths) generally use the UPPER sideband.

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Tags: ssb best practices 160 meters 75/80 meters 40 meters arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Which of the following statements is true of voice VOX operation versus PTT operation?
  • The received signal is more natural sounding
  • Correct Answer
    It allows "hands free" operation
  • It occupies less bandwidth
  • It provides more power output

(B). The advantage of using VOX, or a Voice Operated circuit, is that by simply talking into the microphone, the circuit is opened and you are transmitting. VOX allows for "hands free" operation - you dont have to hit the PTT switch!

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Tags: ssb phone arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

Generally, who should respond to a station in the contiguous 48 states who calls "CQ DX"?
  • Any caller is welcome to respond
  • Only stations in Germany
  • Correct Answer
    Any stations outside the lower 48 states
  • Only contest stations

CQ DX means Calling a station in a outside country or entity, so that means you want to call a contact outside the 48 states

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Tags: arrl chapter 2 arrl module 4

What control is typically adjusted for proper ALC setting on an amateur single sideband transceiver?
  • The RF clipping level
  • Correct Answer
    Transmit audio or microphone gain
  • Antenna inductance or capacitance
  • Attenuator level

The transmit audio or microphone gain is typically adjusted for proper ALC setting on an amateur single sideband transceiver.

The ALC (automatic level control) is a self-controlling transmitter circuit that attempts to maintain a constant level of output power by automatically adjusting the gain of the final amplifier, to prevent it from overloading and damaging the final stage by excessive drive. An operator would adjust the input signal, which is the microphone gain (the transmitted audio) to ensure that the ALC is set appropriately for SSB.

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